Description & Technical information

The present silver beaker is a so-called tumbler of the late baroque period. The bottom has the form of a half-ball, as is the case by tumblers. The very remarkable feature of this beaker is the gilding – inside and outside – as well as the rich engraved décor. On the rim and on the bottom are fine engraved rings. An engraved frieze with arrows starts the decoration of the body. On the body, there are three portraits in medallions engraved, two male and one female busts. One of the male busts is similar to a Roman portrait, while the other two show rather contemporary figures – probably the commanding customers. Lushly engraved acanthus leaves are engraved between the medallions, while these later have also acanthus leaves engraved on the sides, outside the frame. The marks are struck underneath.

Maker

Johann Wagner, goldsmith, was born in 1646 and became a master in 1677. He died in 1724. Johann Wagner is known for a series of beakers, in private collections and in international Museums, like the Kremlin Museum.

Weight: 93 g

Date:  1689-92
Period:  1600-1750, 17th century
Origin:  Germany, Augsburg
Medium: silver-gilt
Signature: City’s hallmark: a “pyr” for Augsburg, period 1689-92
Maker’s mark: a monogram “IW” in a round for Johann Wagner (s. Seling, nr. 1750)
Other marks: control mark of Strasbourg and later French import mark.

Dimensions: 6.6 cm (2⁵/₈ inches)
Categories: Silver