Description & Technical information

The present object is a chocolatpot from Augsburg of the early 18th century. The pot is standing on a low, round, slightly profiled foot. The body has the shape of a pear and is decorated with straight lines that run the whole body from the upper to the lower part. The short spout has a simple form and a hinged lid. The vaulted and with straight lines decorated hinged lid of the pot has a round, screw-knob. The side-handle is of wood, has an S-form and a scrolled thumb rest.

Drinking chocolate was established in Europe around the end of the 17th century. During this time, cacao, exactly like tea and coffee, were almost exclusively from doctors prescribed and was sold in pharmacies. However, these three new warms beverages had conquered the continent by the beginning of the 18th century, through the princely courts and the bourgeoisie.
The warm beverage was prepared with a mixture of cacao, sugar and water. Chocolate was an expensive beverage, because the primary materials were also expensive. In order to enjoy chocolate drinking and on the same time, show one’s elevated, aristocratic status, special services were made of silver and porcelain.
The chocolate pot has a screw-knob, so as to use the opening for a whorl. During the 18th century, cacao was to be drunk only when foaming stirred.

Maker: Johann Joachim II Lutz, catholic, was born in Augsburg. He became a master maker in 1726 and died in 1751.

Date:  1732/34
Period:  1600-1750, 18th century
Origin:  Germany, Augsburg
Medium: silver
Signature: City hallmark: a “pyr” for Augsburg, period 1732/4 (Seling 2007: no 1730)
Maker’s mark: initials, that is monogram “IL” in an oval shield for Johann Joachim II Lutz (Seling 2007: no 2184)

Literature: Baumstark, R. & Seling, H. (Hrsg.), 1994, Silber und Gold: Augsburger Goldschmiedekunst für die Höfe Europas, Kat. Ausst. Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Bd. II, München: Hirmer Verlag/Bayerisches Nationalmuseum
Seling, H., 1980-2007, Die Augsburger Gold- und Silberschmiede 1529-1868, Bd. I-III, München: Beck Verlag

Categories: Silver