Description & Technical information

The thick branch with pinnate leaves of dark green, pale reds and light yellows
occupies the space. The oval fruits have five prominent longitudinal ridges with smooth, waxy skin. The artist has depicted them in three different stages of development, with the flesh turning from pale green when unripe to yellowish-green when ripe. Amongst them, light purple flowers borne on a panicle display their elegant blossoms. A small dissection of the petals appears to the left of the branch, while to the right a cross section of the fruit reveals the star shape from which it derives its common name. Beside this the Chinese inscription yang tao (star fruit) appears, which resembles inscriptions appearing in works in the Reeves Collection. 

The Averrhoa carambola tree has been cultivated in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia for hundreds of years and many parts of the plant are used in traditional medicine. Its name derives from the Marathi word karambal and verrhoa, named after Averrhoes (1126-1198), an Arabian philosopher and physician who translated the works of Aristotle.
For a comparable illustration see ‘Dollar Bird and Starfruit’, William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings, National Museum of Singapore, A.C.  1995-03233.

Date:  18th-19th century
Period:  1750-1850, 18th century, 19th century
Origin:  Probably Macau or Canton, China
Medium: Watercolour on paper
Dimensions: 46.5 x 35 cm (18¹/₄ x 13³/₄ inches)
Categories: Oriental and Asian Art, Paintings, Drawings & Prints