Description & Technical information

Note: The mirror retains much of the original paint surface. The mirror plate is an 18th century replacement.
The carving of the limewood frame is of superlative quality, unquestionably carried out by a master craftsman of the highest calibre. It was always intended to be painted and not gilded. Very few comparable mirrors exist. 
The mirror is based on the design in Plate 9 of Genteel Household Furniture in the Present Taste, published by the London printer and bookseller Robert Sayer between 1760 and 1762. Sayer had previously printed and sold Chippendale’s Director, Mayhew & Ince’s Universal System and Thomas Johnson’s One Hundred and Fifty New Designs, as well as other similar works. Genteel Household Furniture is a collection of then-current designs by Chippendale, Mayhew and Johnson: most of the mirror designs (including plate 9) are by Johnson, and most of the furniture designs are by Chippendale and Mayhew.

Date:  1765
Period:  George III
Origin:  English
Dimensions: 147.5 x 94 x 10 cm (58¹/₈ x 37 x 3⁷/₈ inches)
Provenance: Freddy Anderson, Welshpool, Wales.
Charles Lumb & Sons Ltd., Harrogate, England.
Private collection, England.
Charles Lumb & Sons Ltd., Harrogate, England.
Private collection, Kent, England.
Literature: Society of Upholsterers, Cabinet-makers etc., Genteel Household Furniture in the Present Taste, London, between 1760 and 1762, pl. 9.
Illustrated:
Harold Tweed and Christopher Gilbert, Frank Lumb: An appreciation from his many friends, 1993, pp. 11–12.
Categories: Furniture